The Law of Attraction

“All that we are is the result of what we have thought.”

Buddha

The law of attraction, simply put, states that “like attracts like.” That is, positive thoughts attract to you positive experiences, and negative thoughts attract negative experiences to you.

The deeper implications of this simple yet elusive law of life are that our thoughts are like magnets that attract to us that which we are constantly thinking about. This means that everything we are currently experiencing, and have ever experienced, has been attracted to us, by us, because of our habits of thinking.

This is a difficult truth to accept because it imposes upon us the “burden of freedom,” and implies that we are completely responsible for the outcome of our own lives. Furthermore, it also suggests that, ultimately, there are no victims in life; there are only conscious and unconscious creators. Also, and this is the most difficult aspect of this truth to accept, this means that there is no one to blame for the events and circumstances of our lives outside of ourselves.

Of course, when confronted with this truth, someone with a victim mentality would quick ask the question: why would someone want to attract something negative to themselves? My response to this would be: I don’t know. But, it should be readily apparent that some people, for reasons that are beyond my comprehension, do want bad things to happen to them. The proof of this can be found in many places. For example, perhaps you yourself have been in a relationship with someone that you considered “too good to be true.” As a result of this, you either consciously or unconsciously do something to sabotage the relationship. Perhaps you decide to cheat on this person, or to treat that person in such a terrible way that that person cannot help but respond to you in an equally negative way. At that point you think to yourself, “see. I knew it. I knew you were too good to be true.” Of course, the reality of the situation was most likely that person was exactly what you were really looking for in a mate, but your thoughts about relationships prevented you from fully appreciating that person, and, in fact, led to your beliefs about relationships manifesting as a self-fulfilling prophecy.

If you are still not convinced that there are people out there that are capable of inflicting harm upon themselves, take a stroll to a local bar or pub. There, you will find dozens of people ingesting massive amounts of alcohol into their body, and in doing so, inflicting great harm upon themselves. Sure, it can be argued that the person in the bar drinking their brains out is reacting to the negative circumstances that they have endured in life. Perhaps you think they are self-medicating to try to cope with some of the many forms of abuse and neglect they have suffered in life. To this, I would reply that there are far more constructive forms of coping with life challenges than alcohol poisoning. Certainly, it is within the grasp of even the most isolated, underprivileged person to find counseling, supportive friends, or family members to help cope with life challenges.

An example from my own life should further illustrate this point. Recently, while driving through the town in which I reside (Boulder, CO) I ran into a homeless man that I have conversed with a few times, and who I found to be a very interesting person. So, when I saw him walking alone down the street, I pulled up beside him and asked him if he needed a ride somewhere. It turned out he was in the midst of repairs on a customer’s car, and needed to be driven to a neighboring town to go pick up a cheap part for the car. I agreed to do this, and begin driving all over town for what ended up taking hours to help him track down a cheap part for this car. At one point in our ride, he began speaking to me of his challenges of being homeless and how nobody ever helps him out! This was extremely ironic to me, as I was sitting right next to him at that very moment, doing all that I could to help him out. The point of this story is that even in the midst of being helped, this man could not see that he was being helped. The belief that he was totally alone and that no one ever wanted to help him was so deeply entrenched that he couldn’t recognize help even as he was receiving it. In other words, the experience that this man was having in his mind (and therefore, what was true and real for him) was that no one ever helps him, even as he was in the midst of receiving help. That is the law of attraction!

Not only are we always right about life (even when our beliefs conflict with our actual life experience), but we all end up getting out of life what we expect to get even when what we are actually getting is more or less than we expected.

Take note of your beliefs about all aspects of life including money, relationships, and your deepest purpose in life, and see how those beliefs compare to your actual experience in life. Do you consider yourself poor even as all of your material needs are at this moment being met? Do you ever feel alone even as you have a loving partner or committed friends that would do anything for you? If so, perhaps it is time for you to change some of your core beliefs about life. Perhaps you would find it worthwhile to begin to pay attention to your core beliefs about life and how they compare to your actual experience you are having in life. For, the deepest implication of the law of attraction is that all of us are always right about life. The seemingly superficial adage that suggests “what you see is what you get” is another way of expressing this law. What you see is what you get, and what you see is based on what you believe. So, take note of your deepest held beliefs about life, because what you believe is what you get.

 

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